Spoke rub

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Is spoke rub something that...
a) can be avoided (given 28h, 2x or 3x lacing) and
b) can damage the spokes enough so that they brake?
 
Solution
Crossing spokes pressing against each other is beneficial for tension change compensation when using disc brakes or pedalling. The only way to avoid rub that I can think of is to lace the wheels without spokes interlacing at the crossing (i.e. without the spoke exiting hub flange outwards being laced under the last spoke it crosses).

A way to reduce the rubbing noise:
  • Well-tensioned spokes (the lower the tension, the more likely are the spokes to make the rubbing noise at the crossing).
  • A bit of lube at the crossing ("flossing" the crossing with some waxed dental floss can do the job without attracting much dust and dirt as oil or a drop of wax could do).
I haven't seen spokes break at the crossing point (at least not...
Crossing spokes pressing against each other is beneficial for tension change compensation when using disc brakes or pedalling. The only way to avoid rub that I can think of is to lace the wheels without spokes interlacing at the crossing (i.e. without the spoke exiting hub flange outwards being laced under the last spoke it crosses).

A way to reduce the rubbing noise:
  • Well-tensioned spokes (the lower the tension, the more likely are the spokes to make the rubbing noise at the crossing).
  • A bit of lube at the crossing ("flossing" the crossing with some waxed dental floss can do the job without attracting much dust and dirt as oil or a drop of wax could do).
I haven't seen spokes break at the crossing point (at least not without some strong outwards force, so not due to rubbing), so I would say it is nothing to worry about in those terms, more a noisy nuisance, than a technical problem to worry about.

Relja SilenceIsGolden Novović
 
Solution
Well-tensioned spokes (the lower the tension, the more likely are the spokes to make the rubbing noise at the crossing).
Very well said. It can be added that the uniformity of the tension of the spokes is also important.
I've come across this on my DT Swiss wheels. When I was driving, I constantly heard "tin-tin-tin" from the spokes of the wheel.
On the left is the uniformity of tension from the store. On the right - after my tension correction.
Screenshot_20210826_192834.png

After correcting the tension of the spokes, the sound disappeared (y)
 

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